Tag Archives: reading

The Value of Penny Kittle PD

Standard

Charged with the task of trying to articulate what has Penny Kittle done to transform my teaching feels like a daunting task – but a worthy task.

Well, to begin, Penny Kittle has written two amazing books (among others), which are touchstones in my professional development:

Book Love

As for her PD Workshops: I’ve seen her in about 10 NCTE 20-30 minute Sessions in the last three years, and I participated in CRC’s Workshop last year for an entire day.  With every encounter I have a new strategy, a new “aha”!  Her generosity knows no bounds, and she empowers teachers with what they need and how to do it for student engagement and success.   She helps teachers with inclusion strategies so that all kids can find success and inspiration too.   Plus, she provides all her materials through handouts and on her site.

Her books are excellent, but like getting materials from any good teacher, you need to find a way to make it your own.  Usually with most good PD or good materials, the piles of good ideas remain in piles – awaiting the elusive concept of “time” to come along to allow a teacher to comb through the pile.  Yet, Penny’s full day PD is different, it forces you into the “doing”, allowing you time, inspiration, conversation, and practicality so the PD develops you quickly and effectively.  In “the doing” her materials and strategies become accessible to our classes and our collegiality, immediately.

Sending ELA teachers from our campuses of middle to high school, allows for wonderful collegiality to develop as the teachers can equally be inspired, can equally develop common language and paradigm shifts, and they can equally experience collective transformation of pedagogy and practice.  It is a common place to build collegial practice and professional conversations that can unify our goals and strategies.   In fact, I’d encourage administrators to join in this paradigm shifting PD too!

Here is a list of things I (and some of my ELA colleagues) do differently thanks to the Kittle-aha (I’m sure I have only captured the tip of the iceberg here):

READING:

  • Daily SSR – for students and for me to model
  • Strategies to help kids find the “right book” to hook them into reading
  • Methods to manage student accountability in reading (i.e. book talks, read-write-revise in Writing Journals, Reading Ladders)
  • Inspiration to build the classroom library
  • Book talks and book trailers
  • Reading strategies that work to improve students’ reading skills
  • Conferences about reading – how to do this well
  • Class discussions about Reading Identity of students
  • Close reading analysis strategies – how to dig deeper
  • Poetry – teaching it for kids to connect (especially been inspired by Slam Poets I would have never heard of if not through her – Sarah Kay, Phil Kay, etc..)
  • Non-fiction writing and writers as source materials – and how to analyze the rhetorical strategies in the text.
  • Novels and authors that have been popular with her students (this is a huge asset when trying to match students with the right books)
  • How to have a Reader/Writer notebook for novel studies (authentic academic note-taking that moves students beyond worksheets)
  • Learning to read info-data as a text (this is significant for new things we’re seeing on Diploma reading exams, but given no resources for to prepare students as all our “Released Material” is at least 4 years old.
  • How to “Read like a Writer” with annotations

WRITING:

  • Writing Journal – which she calls a Writer’s Notebook.  She does extensive work showing the effect this has on the teacher-as-model-writer and the effect on students.     Notebook
  • Quick Write ideas/inspirations
  • Writing with students – “Write Beside Them”
  • How reading great writers inspires great writing through emulation and inspiration
  • Revision and editing strategies – mini-lessons, notebook, revisions/editing, polished writing revisions/editing
  • Narrative writing strategies
  • Argumentation writing strategies
  • Expository writing strategies
  • Targets in writing – how to, scaffolding, and assessment
  • Scaffolding to increase skills and learning habits of writers – process and skills
  • The Creative Writing course for my Grade 12’s originates out of inspiration from her Writer’s Workshop.
  • Rubrics and assessment strategies

STRUCTURE:

FURTHER PD INSPIRATION:

Penny Kittle is a rock star in English teaching circles.  But her humility and integrity compels her cite her sources and her own inspirations through her books, her website, her PD workshops, and her twitter updates.  She leads teachers to other rock star English teaching inspirations, forcing us into a transformative world of English teaching that continues to morph and improve.  Here are a few other great teachers she has led me to:

Thoughts about the Kittle-effect by other ELA teachers:

My Response to a Central Office query regarding the value of Kittle:

Penny Kittle is, without a doubt, one of the most powerfully inspiring educators I have ever seen.  She has been the source of my shift in crafting a much stronger ELA program over the past couple of years since I was first inspired by her in Chicago at NCTE.

I believe she is “THE” missing link for our Scope and Sequencing from K-12, as her work is both as an ELA High School teacher AND the Literacy Coach from K-12 in her district of New Hampshire.

It is my belief that ELA teams – inter-mixed from K-12 – attend.   What I mean by intermixed is that at a session HS doesn’t sit with HS, MS with MS, and E with E; rather, we build conversations and PD across campuses and grade levels.  I would support and persuade that the entire HS team to attend.

IF we can support CRC’s efforts to bring in this amazing educator, we would benefit greatly!

http://pennykittle.net/

Original email proposal supporting a Scope and Sequence of educators to attend PD:

CRC has arranged for Penny Kittle to come to Calgary.  She has been my #1 mentor these past few years regarding my professional growth and development.

Penny provides practical advice and strategies for teachers to foster student reading and writing.   As ELA teachers we have so much to manage, with very few resources for HOW to do what we need to be doing.  Penny’s advice is sound and effective, as I’ve witnessed in the success of ELA classes through my improved design of instruction and the students’ improved engagement.

The beautiful thing about Penny is that she too is in the class.  So, her advice and strategies evolve and are tried and tested with everyday classes, everyday challenging kids.

As an organization, I believe that our Scope and Sequencing from middle school to high school is an essential ingredient for our school’s success, yet we have so few opportunities to foster this.  If ELA teachers are sent to this PD – en mass – from 7-12, intermixed in groups from different campuses and grade levels, we would all share in some powerful strategies to develop our students’ reading and writing skills; with Penny, the focus is not on the “what” should we teach, it is on the “how” we teach.  So, the more our teachers develop “Kittle” proficiencies, the more our organization benefits, the more our kids benefit.

Hopefully, we can find the funding to support this PD opportunity for our ELA teams.  I suggest that teachers sign-up soon as she renowned beyond my world and I have a feeling this PD could fill up quickly!

http://www.crcpd.ab.ca/uploads/programs/2762.pdf?92166

Advertisements

For the Love of Reading

Standard

My all-time favorite book is… Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte!  

Cover of "Wuthering Heights (Barnes & Nob...

Cover via AmazonWhy?

 I have always loved WUTHERING HEIGHTS by Emily Bronte as it stole my heart and mind at the age of 18.  It taught me about the pitfalls of idealism and single-mindedness – two flaws I possessed as an adolescent and continue to struggle with today.  I saw so much of myself in spoiled Catherine, and I longed for a mysterious dark Heathcliff to come my way even though my sensibilities warned me otherwise. 

In the pit of my existence I am a hopeless Romantic and the pathos in this novel is evidenced in the quote where Heathcliff mourns the loss of Catherine: “… for what is not connected with her to me? and what does not recall her? I cannot look down to this floor, but her features are shaped in the flags! In every cloud, in every tree—filling the air at night, and caught by glimpses in every object by day—I am surrounded with her image! The most ordinary faces of men and women—my own features—mock me with a resemblance. The entire world is a dreadful collection of memoranda that she did exist, and that I have lost her!”  Ah, the intensity and melodrama of this Gothic tale stirs my heart, but it is also the intensely layered darkness and horror of these pathetic creatures that rapt my imagination.  Ironically, I never really loved these anti-heroes or anti-heroines, but I connected to them, understood them.  Furthermore, I loved the journey of Romanticism through the storytelling magic that the wildest Bronte sister weaved. 

Notably, at the age of 18, the novel was a monumental challenge for me to comprehend in terms of historical thematic genre, narrative structure, and the stylistically poetic language of the 19th Century Romantic movement of literature, so it was such an accomplishment when I got through it and wrote an essay about it.   Although I had always been a reader, this novel was painfully difficult, and I believe it is the book that made me fall in love with English as a subject to study with the mind, not just with the heart. 

Reading Wuthering Heights helped me to find the confidence to pursue a life of academia and it was the beginning of my quest into the literary landscapes of Europe during the Romantic and Victorian Era of the 19th Century.  It led me to the great Romantic poets, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (another absolute favourite), the other Bronte sisters, Thomas Hardy, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Wilke Collins, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Twain, Ibsen, among many others.  Ultimately, Wuthering Heights is the book that lured me into a literary realm where my mind and heart co-exist in the tumultuously transformational epic landscape of my imagination.